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Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Watch this video to learn exactly what sleep apnea is and does to you.

ORAL APPLIANCE THERAPY

Oral Appliance Therapy is one of 3 ways to treat obstructive sleep apnea. It is the main alternative to CPAP therapy. The therapy involves wearing a device that is fitted and worn in the mouth and allows for an open airway during sleep. Many devices that fit like mouth guards are offered by Bold Smiles. Dr. Bolding customizes appliances and treatment plans for each of our patients, depending on the severity and type of sleep apnea conditions they experience. To learn about oral appliance therapy in Searcy and surrounding areas, call our office at 501-279-7779 and schedule your free consultation today!

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Dental Crowns are used to strengthen teeth that have been weakened by damage, cavities, or fractures. They help improve your tooth’s structure and make your mouth more aesthetically appealing. Crowns can be made from a variety of materials. Gold and various alloys are typically used for back teeth while porcelain is a better choice for front teeth as it more closely resembles your natural tooth color. But there’s a new player in the field of dental crowns. The BruxZir crown is made of solid zirconia and is incredibly strong while still maintaining the strength needed for chewing.

What is a BruxZir crown?

BruxZir dental crowns are an incredibly durable solution to your dental needs. Made out of solid zirconia, this material was design to look good yet maintain the functionality required of teeth. The strength of a BruxZir crown is actually greater than the requirements for cemented all-ceramic restorations. It’s perfect for anterior and premolars teeth because its translucency and color are as close to natural coloring as possible.

What are the benefits of a BruxZir crown?

The BruxZir crown offers far more benefits that traditional porcelain and gold solutions. It looks better, is stronger, and isn’t prone to chipping and cracking. This is the best solution for those seeking a high-strength restoration without compromising a natural appearance and lifelike translucency.

These crowns last about 10-15 years. They last about as long as gold and metal crowns, however, are much more attractive.

What are the disadvantages of BruxZir?

The biggest disadvantage of BruxZir is that it has an opposite abrasive effect. If placed over a tooth whose decay was not brought under control, it could impact the tooth root and surrounding teeth.

If you’re looking for a solution to your dental needs and want a crown that’s both long-lasting and attractive, consider BruxZir. Our team at Bold Smiles can help determine if they’re a fit for your needs, and map out a course of treatment for you.

Medical technology has been advancing at a breakneck pace for the past several decades, and dentistry hasn’t been left behind. Dental professionals are constantly looking for the newest forms of treatments and technology that will aid in providing their patients with the best possible care, and we’re going to introduce you to some of the newest advancements that have been made.

VELscope

This technology employs a special form of light that our dentists use to detect dental abnormalities. VELscope is particularly effective in the detection of disease and cancer in its earliest stages as part of an oral screening.

Digital X-Rays

A common concern of patients is the amount of radiation they’re exposed to during a dental exam. The newest forms of imaging technology employ digital x-rays, which not only employs 90% less radiation than traditional x-rays but provides viewable films to the dental staff immediately. These images are able to be zoomed in on for highly accurate assessments of dental health.

Invisalign

For decades braces have been the go-to method of straightening misaligned teeth. While effective, braces are uncomfortable and unsightly. Invisalign is an innovation in this area of dental care that provides the benefits of braces while remaining nearly invisible. Additionally, Invisalign can be removed when eating, removing dietary restrictions associated with braces.

Laser Dentistry

Past techniques for whitening, reducing tooth sensitivity, tumor removal, and filling cavities have often been uncomfortable for the patient, and time-consuming. New innovations in laser technology have created painless alternatives that also aid in eliminating harmful bacteria.

Dental Implants

Traditional dentures are often ill-fitting, uncomfortable, and prone to embarrassing mishaps like slippage. Modern dental implants provide prosthetic teeth that are nearly indistinguishable from normal teeth and are long-lasting.

DIAGNOdent

This cutting-edge technology is capable of detecting cavities in places that traditional x-ray techniques can’t locate. By employing DIAGNOdent your dentist ensures that no early signs of cavities go unnoticed, saving you time and money on future dental treatments.

Intraoral Camera

This tool employs a special camera that provides well-defined and precise images of places difficult to see in a patient’s mouth with traditional imaging. Just one more tool to aid your dentist in a thorough and accurate assessment of your dental condition.

These are just some of the technologies that have been brought into common use in recent years in our dental offices. Every year we keep an eye out for new methods of treating our patient’s dental concerns by improving visibility, reducing discomfort, and aiding us in providing complete and thorough assessments. If you have any questions about the technology your dentist is using in your exams, don’t hesitate to ask! Curious patients are educated patients, and we love to encourage our patients to be knowledgeable about their dental care.

Digital x-rays are a more streamlined way of taking dental radiographs. Like traditional x-rays, digital versions provide an in-depth view of the structures of the mouth, helping dentists detect complications and develop effective modes of treatment. Digital x-rays are capable of revealing hidden caries, bone erosion, and even tooth decay hiding beneath restorations.

Requiring less radiation and no film to process, digital x-rays have become the standard for oral imaging. These systems produce instant digital images that can easily be enhanced and enlarged for a more accurate diagnosis. The images are captured, stored, and even transmitted via in-office computers. In fact, dentists can easily print or email copies of x-rays in just seconds.

Dental x-rays make for a better and more efficient patient experience. Office visits are faster, patients are exposed to less radiation, and radiographs can be sent to a specialist for review in a fraction of the time necessary for traditional film x-rays.

Dental sealants are clear coatings applied to the surfaces of a child’s molars to prevent the development of tooth decay. They work by preventing food and plaque from resting in the grooves and crevices of molars – an area especially susceptible to cavities. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, nearly 1 in 3 U.S. children ages 6 to 12 currently have sealants on their teeth.

Did you know…

that sealants can last as long as 5 to 10 years pediatric dental patients? Depending on a child’s oral development and risk factors for tooth decay, sealants may be applied to the teeth as young as age 6. It is at this time that the first molars typically appear. Additional molars erupt at approximately age 12. If possible, sealants should be applied to a child’s teeth immediately after any molar has appeared to reduce the risk of early decay.

Frequently Asked Questions

Will dental sealants affect the feel or appearance of my child’s teeth?

Sealants bond directly to the teeth, where they harden to a clear or tooth-colored coat. This makes them virtually undetectable to others. Though it is normal to feel new sealants with the tongue, most children quickly adapt to their presence.

What will my child experience when getting sealants?

The process of getting sealants is fast and painless. The tooth is cleaned before the dentist paints the sealant onto the enamel. The sealant will immediately harden, acting as a barrier between bacteria and the chewing surface of the teeth. In most cases, sealants will last several years before needing to be reapplied. However, regular visits to the dentist will be necessary to monitor the condition of the sealants and examine their effectiveness.

Will sealants prevent all cavities?

While sealants are extremely effective for preventing tooth decay in children, they do not replace other forms of preventative oral health care. Children should still brush and floss each day using a fluoridated toothpaste. Regular dental exams and a balanced diet low in sugar are also essential for good long-term oral health.

Dentures are an effective and affordable way of replacing missing teeth. Composed of a durable plastic resin and sometimes porcelain, both partial and full dentures can be fabricated to look and feel natural. Today’s dentures are custom-fit to make it possible to eat foods with confidence and speak articulately. Depending on the patient’s preferences and budget, dentures can be crafted for maximum comfort and fracture resistance backed up by limited warranties.

Did you know…

that more than 60 percent of American adults are missing one or more teeth? Approximately 10 percent are missing all of their teeth – requiring a prosthetic solution that will restore function and aesthetics to their smiles. Many of those dental patients choose partial or full dentures to replace missing teeth. In fact, it is estimated that 35 million Americans currently wear partial or full dentures – a number that is only expected to rise as baby boomers begin to reach retirement.

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I a candidate for dentures?

You may be a candidate for dentures if you are missing one or more teeth and are in need of an affordable prosthetic solution. Most denture wearers find that partial and full dentures can restore much of their original tooth function – not to mention create a beautiful, natural-looking smile. To find out if dentures are right for you, schedule a consultation with your dentist.

What should I expect when being fit for dentures?

If you have any decayed or damaged teeth that need to be removed, they will be extracted before your dentist takes a mold of your remaining gum structure, as well as the roof of your mouth. This mold will be sent to a dental lab for denture fabrication. When the completed dentures are completed, you will return to your dentist for a final fitting.

Will I need to follow any special instructions to care for my new dentures?

Yes. Dentures are removable prosthetics that will need to be cleaned and brushed daily. You should also brush your gums daily to prevent infections caused by bacteria. Your dentures should be kept in water when they aren’t in use to prevent them from warping. Keep in mind that it may take some time to adjust to dentures as you learn how to use the muscles in your cheeks and tongue to keep them in place. But over time, you should begin to feel more comfortable with your new prosthetics.

A bite guard is a dental appliance custom-fit to a patient’s teeth. Bite guards serve varying purposes and are often recommended for use in patients of all ages. It is important that bite guards be professionally fit, rather than purchased over the counter, as this ensures maximum comfort and protection during wear. Professional dental guards are usually prepared in a dental lab using an oral impression taken in a dentist’s office. These guards are created uniquely to each patient to prevent discomfort, slippage or inadequate protection. There are many reasons why a dentist would prescribe a mouth guard to a patient. They include:

Did you know?

Caring for a dental bite guard is simple. You’ll need to rinse it before and after every usage using a soft-bristled toothbrush, toothpaste and cold water. From time to time, cleanse it with cold water and a mild soap. When not in use, store your mouth guard in a hard, ventilated container and keep it away from hot temperatures that could cause your guard to warp.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need a bite guard?

You absolutely need to be fit for a custom bite guard if you participate in sports or activities that put your oral health at risk. These guidelines also apply to children, who often play sports like football or participate in activities like martial arts, which can cause tooth-related injuries. You may also need a bite guard if your dentist diagnosis you with bruxism, or tooth-grinding. Over time, grinding or clenching the teeth can lead to wear and irreversible damage. Sleeping with a bite guard can protect the teeth from these unwanted side effects.

What should I expect when being fit for a dental bite guard?

Being fit for a bite guard is simple. You’ll visit your dentist, who will take an impression of your teeth and send it off to a dental laboratory. The lab will carefully construct a durable and comfortable new bite guard that you can pick up at your dentist’s office in just days.

Will I need to return to my dentist after getting my new bite guard?

Yes. Although custom bite guards are made of durable materials and designed to last through many uses, they do need to be replaced from time to time. Keep an eye on your bite guard, checking it frequently for wear. Also, bring it with you to your normal dental cleanings and check-ups for a professional inspection. Be sure to tell your dentist if your bite guard no longer offers an optimal fit or if it has become uncomfortable to wear.

Like a bridge, partial dentures rest on surrounding teeth to fill in the gaps where one or more teeth are missing. But unlike a bridge, partial dentures are fully removable by the wearer. Partials are affordable alternatives to other types of dental prosthetics and are custom-made to blend in with each patient’s natural teeth. It takes a little time to adapt to new partials, but many people find that they reclaim much of their original function and aesthetics with partial dentures in place.

Did you know?

Partial dentures require gentle care and frequent cleaning. Once you get your new partial dentures, you’ll need to:

Frequently Asked Questions

Am I a candidate for partial dentures?

You may be a candidate for partial dentures if you have one or more missing teeth, and the space they once filled is surrounded by other teeth or permanent restorations. To find out more about whether partial dentures are right for you, schedule a consultation with your dentist.

What should I expect when being fit for partial dentures?

If you decide to get a partial denture, you’ll need to visit your dentist to have metal clasps attached to your surrounding teeth and an impression made of the area your partial will fill. The impression will be sent to a dental lab, where a technician will fabricate a custom denture that includes a gum-colored base that will fit securely over your gums. A metal framework will be used to attach your new partial to the clasps on your natural teeth to ensure a secure fit.

Will I need to follow any special oral health instructions after receiving my partials?

Yes. Good oral health is still important – even if you have a few missing teeth. In addition to caring for your new dental prosthetic, you’ll also need to brush your gums and tongue twice daily to stimulate circulation and remove bacteria that could cause gum disease. Continue seeing your dentist twice yearly for exams and cleanings, and be sure to bring your partial dentures along to each visit. After a few years, you may find that your partial needs to be rebased to better fit the changes to the bone structure in your mouth.

Provisional restorations are often used during complex restorative dental procedures to serve as temporary prosthetic replacements while patients wait for a permanent restoration. Provisional restorations offer patients to try-out the look and feel of the final prosthetic and make any necessary changes before the final fabrication and fitting. Unlike temporary prosthetics of the past, modern provisional restorations are highly functional and aesthetically pleasing. Today’s temporaries are composed of a quality acrylic resin that mimics the look and feel of permanent metal or ceramic restorations.

Did you know…

Provisional restorations are a primary component of smile reconstructions. In addition to serving cosmetic purposes for patients with missing or damaged teeth, dental temporaries provide the following functions:

Frequently Asked Questions

Will I need a provisional restoration during the course of my dental treatment?

You may need a provisional restoration if you are preparing to get a new crown, bridge, veneers, dental implants or some other permanent restoration. Temporaries may be put in place to ensure you are pleased with the aesthetics and fit of your new prosthetic. You may also be fit for a provisional restoration while you wait for a dental lab to finalize your permanent ones.

What should I expect when being fit for a dental temporary?

Temporaries are constructed in a dental laboratory using impressions and digital images of your teeth. The lab will produce a ‘wax-up’ that you will approve before the temporaries are fabricated. Your dentist will prepare your teeth for the provisional restorations and temporarily attach them to your teeth, where they will remain until you are ready for your permanent restorations.

Will I need to follow any special guidelines after receiving my temporary restoration?

You may need to wear your temporaries for just a few days or for several months depending on the type of dental reconstruction you are undergoing. Temporaries formed in place of crowns or veneers may only need to be worn for a few days to a few weeks, whereas dental implant and full-mouth reconstruction patients will need to wear provisional restorations for several months while the gums heal and the implants fuse with surrounding bone. Keep in mind that provisional restorations are less durable than permanent ones and are placed using provisional cement. Because it is possible for them to shift or become damaged, you should be careful to follow your dentist’s guidelines for caring for your temporaries – including using good oral hygiene, abiding by dietary restrictions, and using protective mouth gear during sports or high impact activity.

For years, dental x-rays have been used to diagnose oral health complications and detect decaying or damaged teeth. X-rays provide a unique view of the mouth that isn’t possible with a visual exam alone. When x-rays are taken, the teeth and bones absorb the majority of the ray, making them highly visible on film or on a screen. Nearly all new dental patients are x-rayed, although you may instead request that previous x-rays be transferred from another dental provider to your new dentist. By comparing your x-rays with your full mouth examination and dental history, your dentist can prescribe effective treatment and recommend a plan for preventative care.

Did you know…

that dental x-rays deliver very low levels of radiation and are considered completely safe? In fact, x-rays are even considered safe during pregnancy and while breastfeeding so long as a leaded apron and collar are used to protect your body from exposure. If you are pregnant or think you may be, tell your dentist so proper precautions can be taken.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I get dental x-rays?

Yes. Dental x-rays are capable of identifying tooth decay and damage beneath the surface of the teeth where caries are less visible during an examination. Furthermore, x-rays provide a reference point for the progression of decay in your mouth over time. You should have x-rays taken on a regular basis, but especially if you are experiencing oral health complications or are planning to undergo a dental procedure, such as a root canal.

What should I expect when I get dental x-rays?

Getting traditional dental x-rays can take several minutes. A thick paper tab is placed into the mouth, which you will be asked to bite down on. Most patients find that dental x-rays are completely painless and do not inflict any level of discomfort. In some cases, dentists intraoral x-rays, as well as extra-oral x-rays that snap images of the face, jaw and skull. Extra-oral x-rays are typically used to identify impacted teeth, such as wisdom teeth.

What happens after my dentist has taken x-rays?

Your x-rays will be saved either on film or digitally. In the future, your dentist may request additional dental x-rays every few years to monitor the health of your teeth, gums and jaw over time. If you are considered to be high risk for oral disease or are exhibiting symptoms of complications, your dentist may prefer to take x-rays more frequently.

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